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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ir.ncue.edu.tw/ir/handle/987654321/15501

Title: We are the Land: Ecoethical Discourse and Moral Imagination in the Writings of Scott Momaday and Leslie Marmon Silko
我們即土地:莫馬戴與席爾柯作品中的生態倫理論述與道德想像
Authors: Chang, Yueh-Chen
Contributors: 英語學系
Keywords: Momaday;Scott;Silko;Leslie Marmon
生態倫理;原住民
Date: 2003-11
Issue Date: 2013-02-05T02:27:40Z
Publisher: 彰化師大文學院
Abstract: Traditional Native Americans deem their existence and identity formation inseparable from the land they reside in. They regard highly their close connection with landscape, and show deep respect for nature. Their reverence for the interdependent beings on earth also determines their cosmological and ecological views. However, under the colonization of European settlers, Native Americans were gradually removed from their own native lands, suffering a strong sense of dislocation and displacement. Even when contained in a reservation area, Native Americans must confront the encroachment of greedy white capitalists who envy and crave for the abundant natural resources in the area. Compelled, sometimes, by hunger and poverty to sell their lands and to accept the capitalist dumping of wastes on their lands, Native Americans endured a great pain of facing the alternation of their own cultural and physical landscapes. To construct the narrative of this collective racial memory, Native American writers choose to rely on the power of imagination they observe to contain in their verbal tradition. In this paper, I will draw upon N. Scott Momaday's House Made of Dawn and Leslie Marmon Siko's Ceremony to examine how imagination functions to foster the construction of narrative and promulgate ecological ethics in Native American texts. I will also explore how contemporary Native American writers confront the state of colonialism by addressing the ecological and ethical issues in terms of what Momaday calls “moral imagination.”
傳統美國原住民視其生存與屬性之建立與其所居住之土地間有著不可分割的關係。他們重視與四周景觀間保持的親密關係也極為尊重自然。由此對大地中相互依存關係的敬重決定其生態與宇宙觀。然而,被歐洲移民殖民的經驗迫使原住民逐漸遠離其土地過著顛沛流離被錯置的痛苦。即使被圈豢於保留區中,原住民仍然逃不過覬覦其豐富自然資源的資本野心家的侵犯。在貧病交迫的困厄情境中,原住民常被迫出賣土地或接受廢棄物傾倒於保留區的現實並忍受景觀文化的改變。當代原住民作家選擇以蘊藏於族群口與傳統中的想像力量重建這樣的原住民集體族群記憶的敘述。本論文中將以席爾科的《儀式》及莫馬戴的《日昇之屋》為例探討想像如何孕育敘事的建構及宣揚流布原住民文本中的生態倫理。同時亦探討當代原住民作家如何藉由莫馬戴所謂的道德想像的觀點陳述其生態倫理觀以迎抗殖民主義。
Relation: 彰化師大文學院學報, 2: 241-259
Appears in Collections:[英語學系] 期刊論文

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